[Contents]

How To Make Your Own Tile Sets for the Shanghai Games


Make Your Own Tile Sets!

You can create and play with your own custom tiles! Paint your own Flowers or Dragons. Or cut and paste faces of your family and pets onto the tiles, and match them up! Share your special tile sets with your family and friends!

All the Shanghai game modes in Shanghai: Second Dynasty support the use of custom tile sets. To clarify, the custom tiles only work in the Shanghai tile-matching modes. The Mah-Jongg games, of course, can only be played with regular Mah-Jongg tiles. There isn't a special "tile editor" built into the game, but everything you need is available either on your computer or on the CD, or just a few clicks away on the Internet.

What's on the CD

On the CD are the tiles used in the game, as well as example custom tile files and template files.

Windows users:
- Double-click My Computer.
- Single-click the CD drive icon to highlight it.
- From the File menu, select Open.
- In the window that opens, double-click the Setup folder.
- Double-click the Data folder.
- Double-click the Custom Tilesets folder.

Everything you need is right there! If you know how, it would be a good idea to create a shortcut to this folder on your desktop so you can return to this folder easily again.

Macintosh users:
- Double-click the Dynasty2 icon (that's the icon for the Shanghai: Second Dynasty CD).
- Double-click the Data folder.
- Double-click the Custom Tilesets folder.

Everything you need is right there! If you know how, it would be a good idea to create an alias to this folder on your desktop so you can return to this folder easily again.

Inside the Custom Tilesets folder, there are some example tiles (you can play with these tiles in the game), and some very important files:

L-Template.bmp
S-Template.bmp

Large and Small Tiles

When you installed Shanghai: Second Dynasty, you chose one size to be installed. One size was installed to your hard drive. The files in the Custom Tileset all begin with an "L-" or an "S-."

"L-" files are Large tiles, for monitor resolutions of 1024x768 and above (if your monitor is on this resolution, you should have installed the "high resolution" game). The "S-" files are for Small tiles, for monitor resolutions of 800x600 or 640x480 (if your monitor is on one of these resolutions, you should have installed the "low resolution" game).

Both sizes are included on the CD. The game you installed on your hard drive can only use the tile size appropriate to your monitor resolution.

What's on Your Hard Drive

On your hard drive is the installed game and a copy of the Custom Tilesets folder you can use while you work. You can save your custom tile set files in this folder. When you open a custom tile set from within Shanghai, this folder is where the program looks.

Here's how to find the folder. In these instructions, we assume that you did not change the install path when installing the game. If you did change the install path, navigate to the folder where you installed the game, or Find the Custom Tilesets folder.

Windows users:
- Double-click My Computer.
- Double-click the C: drive icon.
- Double-click the Program Files folder.
- Double-click the Activision folder.
- Double-click the Shanghai Second Dynasty folder.
- Double-click the Custom Tilesets folder.
If you know how, it would be a good idea to create an alias to this folder on your desktop so you can return to this folder easily again.

Macintosh users:
- Double-click the icon for your main hard drive.
- Double-click the Shanghai Second Dynasty folder.
- Double-click the Custom Tilesets folder.
If you know how, it would be a good idea to create an alias to this folder on your desktop so you can return to this folder easily again.

Using Files From the CD

The files on the CD are there for you to use. You can open the files from the CD, but any changes you make cannot be saved on the CD (CDs are "read-only" -- you cannot change data on a CD). Save those changes to the installed Custom Tilesets on your hard drive. If you copy a file from the CD to your hard drive, it is "locked," so you need to "unlock" it.

Here's a little exercise designed to get you familiar with how to use files from the CD. It's a good idea to have both the L-Template.bmp and the S-Template.bmp files on your hard drive. The game's installer only installed one of them on your hard drive. Here's how to get the other one.

- Open the Custom Tilesets folder from the CD, using the steps outlined above.
- Open the Custom Tilesets folder on your hard drive, using steps from above also. You should now have two folder windows open. Note that both L-* files and S-* files are visible in the CD folder, while the folder on your hard drive has only one type.
- If you installed Small tiles, click on L-Template.bmp in the CD folder and drag it to the hard drive folder. If you installed Large tiles, click on S-template.bmp instead, and drag it to your hard drive folder.
- Now we're going to unlock the file, or at least check to make sure that it's unlocked.

Windows users:
- Right-click the file icon.
- Select Properties from the pop-up menu.
- Click on the little box labeled Read-only to make sure the box is empty. (When there's an X in the box, you cannot edit and save the file.) If clicking the box puts a checkmark there when there wasn't one before, just click it again to clear it.
Now the file is "writeable." You can edit it and save it at will.

Macintosh users:
- Single-click the file icon.
- From the File menu, select Info.
- Click on the little box labeled Locked to make sure the box is empty. (When there's a checkmark in the box, you cannot edit and save the file.) If clicking the box puts a checkmark there when there wasn't one before, just click it again to clear it.
Now the file is "writeable." You can edit it and save it at will.

There are a lot of useful files on the CD, and now you know how to get them.

Tools You Need

1. A PAINT PROGRAM

To make your own tiles you need a simple paint program with which you can cut and paste your own photos into the spaces in the template, or just paint right into the template.

Windows users:
You should already have Paint (MSPaint.exe), the paint program included with Windows 95 and Windows 98. Here's how to find it:

- Click the Start button.
- Put the cursor on Programs.
- In the popup menu, put the cursor on Accessories.
- In the new popup menu, put the cursor on Paint.
- Click that icon to open the Paint program.

Macintosh users:
Depending on what model you own, you may or may not have a paint program on your computer. If you do not have one, you can go on the Internet and do a search.

Features you'll want:
- Cut and Paste.
- Resize.
- Ability to work with BMP files.
- Paint tools (pen, paintbrush, spraycan, paint bucket, etc.).
- Palette controls (optional; see section on Palettes).

Some paint programs also incorporate the functions of a graphics conversion program -- if not, you also need the features of that kind of program.

2. A GRAPHICS CONVERSION UTILITY

Depending on what paint program you have, your paint program may not have the ability to open picture files you want to use for your tiles. You may need an additional program that can open BMP, JPG, and GIF pictures at least, and convert them to those other formats. You also need the ability to resize images. Advanced users may also want to be able to manipulate palettes. That's what we mean when we say you might need a "graphics conversion utility" in addition to a "paint program."

Windows 98 users:
The version of Paint that came with your version of Windows may be all that you need! You can search and download other utilities or demo programs as well, that may have advanced capabilities beyond those in Paint.

Windows 95 users:
The version of Paint that came with your version of Windows handles BMP files but not JPG or GIF files. You may need to have a conversion utility so that you can cut and paste into the BMP files from JPG and GIF files. You can search the Internet to find such a program that you can download.

Macintosh users:
Search and download a graphics utility that handles not only BMP, JPG, and GIF picture formats but PICT files as well. Your paint program probably requires that you work and save in PICT format. You can search the Internet to find such a program that you can download.

Features you'll want:
- Ability to open files in BMP, JPG, and GIF formats. (for Mac owners: add PICT format.)
- Ability to convert from any above file format to any other above file format.

There are numerous programs available. We're sorry that we can't list them all or make recommendations. Talk to your computer-knowledgeable friends, try downloading some programs, and learn.

How Custom Tile Sets Work

The Shanghai games get the tile face graphics from BMP files installed on your hard drive. When you tell Shanghai to change tile sets, it opens the appropriate BMP file and takes the graphics from the file and puts them on the faces of the tiles in the game. In the case of the tiles provided with the game, it also loads an animation file and a background picture, but let's only consider the tiles themselves.

Large tile sets (for the "high resolution" game setting, running on monitors set to 1024x768 pixels or higher)

Tile size - 60x75 pixels
.BMP picture size - 720x525 pixels
Colors - 256
Format - BMP (required)

Small tile sets (for the low resolution" game, running on monitors set to 640x480 or 800x600 pixels)

Tile size - 40x50 pixels
.BMP picture size - 480x350 pixels
Colors - 256
Format - BMP (required)

For this discussion, let's consider the Small tile sets template file (S-TEMPLATE.BMP).

As you can see in this template file, a tile set file is composed of 34 pairs of tiles and two sets of four tiles. And lest we forget, also a Back and a Joker.

The pairs can either be made up of different-looking (yet logically matching) tiles, or of two identical tiles. Each of the four tiles in the two groups-of-four can be unique and can be matched with any one of the tiles in that group. The total maximum number of tiles you can have in a tile set is 144 tiles.

In the template file, the number determines which tiles match one another, while the letter indicates the variety that is possible within a tile number.

Take a look at some examples. Look in the Custom Tilesets folder, just the way we described before.

A MAH-JONGG tile set:

Look at the file MJCTSETS.BMP (or MJCTSETL.BMP, depending on which resolution you installed). This file is not in your Custom Tilesets folder but rather in your BMP folder.

Notice how there are two One Crak tiles at the upper left corner. Looking right from there, notice how there are two of each tile. Look down at the lower left corner to see the back and the Joker. Look at the lower right corner and notice the special groups -- the Flowers and Seasons. The four Seasons all match one another even though they're not identical. Same for the four Flower tiles.

An ALPHABET tile set:

Look at the file S-ALPHAOLDNEW.BMP (or L-ALPHAOLDNEW.BMP).

Look at the "Eight" tiles at the upper left corner -- both are number eights, but they look different Notice how every tile pair is treated the same way, except at the bottom right. At the bottom right of the picture, you see there are four pictures for the letters A and Z. All four of these tiles match one another, even though they're not all identical. At the lower left is the back and the joker.

Now look again at the template file.

Tile 01a and tile 01b match each other. They don't need to look identical, but they need to relate logically to each other. For instance, they could be mirror images of one another, or one could be a negative image of the other, or one could be upside-down.

Similarly, tile 02a and 02b match each other, and so on. In the case of tiles 35a, 35b, 35c, and 35d, all four tiles will match one another in the game. It's okay if they look identical or don't look identical (either way), but it's best if they relate logically to each other (just like four different flower pictures, assuming none of your other tiles are flowers). Same with 36a, 36b, 36c, and 36d. We call these tiles the "special groups".

How to Make Your Own Tile Set

Let's jump right in and make a quick experiment with tile #1.

If you use Small tiles (you installed the "low resolution" game and your monitor is set to 640x480 or 800x600 pixels):

Open the file S-Template.bmp with your paint program. Save the file under a new name starting with "S-," such as for instance "S-experiment.bmp." Take a picture file you have handy (any kind of picture file) and copy a 40x50 portion of it, and paste that into the upper left corner -- paste it onto tile 01A and then paste it again onto tile 01B. Skip down to where it says Now close the file.

First, paste the picture into tile 01A. Move it into position.

Then, paste the picture again, and place it on tile 01B.

If you use Large tiles (you installed the "high resolution" game and your monitor is set to 1024x768 pixels or higher):

Open the file L-Template.bmp with your paint program. Save the file under a new name starting with "L-," such as for instance "L-my tiles.bmp." Take a picture file you have handy (any kind of picture file) and copy a 60x75 portion of it, and paste that into the upper left corner -- paste it onto tile 01A and then paste it again onto tile 01B.

Now close the file. Make sure the file is in your Custom Tilesets folder, on your hard drive, in the folder where the game is installed.

Start Shanghai: Second Dynasty. Go into the Classic Shanghai game. Go to the Tiles menu. Select "Custom Tiles..." In the window that pops up, select the file you just made.

The game screen will fade to black, then it will fade up and you can see your tiles.

You should now see a lot of tiles saying things like 16B, 21A, 35D, and so on, and you should see at least one tile with the picture you just put on it.

If you see the template faces (02A, 22B, etc.) but you don't see any of your new tiles, just shuffle the tiles a few times, and one or more of them ought to surface eventually. Some layouts may need several shuffles, and some may not need any, depending on how many tile faces are visible at one time in that layout. Kids' layouts especially may not show your special tile, since those layouts don't show all 144 tiles.

If you get an error message instead, you may have done something wrong (perhaps the palette had the wrong number of colors in it, or perhaps the file you saved was the wrong pixel size). If you got an error message, see the section SAVING YOUR CUSTOM FILE (below), and try again.

There, that wasn't too hard, was it? It can be a lot of fun to paste your own images onto the tiles and then use them in a game. Keep reading for even more tips about how to do it.

Starting With Your Own Pictures

If you have a digital camera or a scanner, you already have a good idea how to get your own pictures onto the computer so you can cut and paste from them into the tile set template. If you don't have a digital camera or a scanner, maybe you know someone who does. If you want to have your own pictures on your computer, in a format usable by your graphics programs, it's not too hard to find reasonably-priced scanners these days.

You can also create your own tile graphics, if you're artistically inclined. Or you can download some public domain images from the Internet or you can use some public domain clip art from some other source.

Cut and Paste

Using the paint program, open the picture file you want to use for a tile in your custom tile set. Different paint programs work differently, so we can't give you detailed instructions about how to select a 40x50 or 60x75 image, but hopefully you can figure that out with some help from your paint program. You may have to resize the picture if a person's face is larger than the tile in the template.

Drag a 40x50 or 60x75 rectangle around the portion of the image you want on the tile, and select the Copy function (usually from the Edit menu of your paint program).

Now open your custom tile set file, and select the Paste function. You will see your picture in the image on the screen. You probably have to move the image until it's located exactly on the tile's location in the template.

Now Paste again to put the second tile in place. Paste two copies of each picture on the tile locations (both copies should go on the same number -- 05A and 05B, for instance). The exception to this is tiles 35 and 36 (you need four copies of each of those tiles). We call tiles 35 and 36 the "special group" tiles.

Let's say you want your special groups to represent "airplanes" and "birds." You could draw four different airplanes in boxes 35A through 35D, and four different birds in boxes 36A through 36D.

You can create a custom Back and Joker, too, if you want (they'll be used in the Dragon's Eye and Dynasty games).

If you see color problems (if your picture looked OK in the original file but it looks bad after you paste it into the template), read the section on Palettes, below.

Saving Your Custom File

You can try out your custom file anytime -- you don't have to wait until it's finished and perfect.

Just a few things to keep in mind:

- The filename.
- The size of the BMP picture (in pixels).
- The palette.

Filename

Your filename should ideally begin with an L- or a S- depending on whether it has Large or Small tiles.

Save your new tile set with a logical and unique name. If you are going to share the tile set with your friends or post it on the Internet, keep in mind that somebody else might use the same tile set name you do, if you don't make a good effort to come up with a truly unique tile set name. If you name the file "L-mypix.bmp" maybe somebody else is using the same name.

You shouldn't save it with the name "L-Template.bmp" because that name is already used for a blank template file for Large tiles. If you do save it with that name, your existing template file will be overwritten and you'll have to get a new one from the CD (see the section GETTING A CLEAN BLANK TEMPLATE FILE, below).

The size of the BMP picture file.

The game will not be able to open a picture file smaller than 480x350 pixels (Small tiles) or 720x525 pixels (Large tiles). If your picture is smaller or larger than the required size, resize it or crop it and it should work.

The palette.

The game can only open files with two types of palettes: 256 colors (8-bit) or 64,000 colors (24-bit). The game will not be able to open a picture file using any other kind of palette. When you save your game, if the paint program offers a "Save as type" choice, make sure that it isn't saving the game with some other number of colors. See the section on Palettes, below.

Getting a Clean Blank Template File

"Help! I messed up my template file, where can I get a clean blank one?"

Don't worry, if the blank template file on your hard drive is filled with graphics, you can always get a fresh blank template file from the CD. That's why we told you where it is on the CD too (not just on your hard drive)! Aren't we smart? (^_^) See the section entitled "USING FILES FROM THE CD." You can never mess up the template file on the CD because it's read-only ("locked"). When you copy a file from the CD, don't forget to change its properties so it's not read-only or "locked," like we mentioned before.

Using Your Custom Tile Sets in the Game

Importing Custom Tile Sets

Ideally, you are working on your custom set in the Custom Tilesets folder, but if you aren't, you can either move the file there before starting the game, or when you are in the game's Open dialog box, you can navigate to where the file is located to open it. It's better for the file to be in the Custom Tilesets folder. Putting the file in a different folder might make it hard for the game to read the file, or might cause other problems.

Start Shanghai: Second Dynasty. From the Title screen, select Shanghai. Go to the Tiles menu and select Custom Tiles.... The Open dialog box appears, listing the contents of the Custom Tilesets folder. Highlight your file, and click on Open.

Your tile set will be loaded and displayed on game tiles. If the colors are not right, something happened to the palette. Not to worry, it can be fixed. See About Palettes, below.

You can click on matching tiles and they will be removed, just like with regular Shanghai tiles. When you use a custom tile set in Shanghai, the tiles do not animate when removing a pair. Only the in-game tile sets (those provided with Shanghai, and listed in the Tiles menu in the game) are animated.

About Palettes

Shanghai: Second Dynasty can accept tile set files that use palettes of 256 colors (8 bits) or 64,000 colors (24 bits). Here's a guide to palette terms:

1. 1 bit: 2 colors -- Black and White only (no shades of gray). Shanghai: Second Dynasty cannot handle files of this color setting. You need to "Save As" a 256-color file or a 24-bit file.

2. 4 bits: 16 colors -- Shanghai: Second Dynasty cannot handle files of this color setting. Save As a 256-color file or a 24-bit file.

3. 8 bits: 256 colors -- Shanghai: Second Dynasty's minimum required palette setting. If the 256 colors used in your tile set file do not match the 256 colors required by Shanghai: Second Dynasty, the game will convert the colors to the nearest possible supported colors.

4. 15 bits: 32,000 colors -- Shanghai: Second Dynasty cannot handle files of this color setting. "Save As" a 256-color file or a 24-bit file.

5. 16 bits (High Color): 64,000 colors -- Shanghai: Second Dynasty cannot handle files of this color setting. "Save As" a 256-color file or a 24-bit file.

6. 24 bits: 16 million colors -- Shanghai: Second Dynasty will convert colors down to the nearest possible colors in the game's 256-color palette.

7. 32 bits (True Color): 4 billion colors -- Shanghai: Second Dynasty cannot handle files of this color setting. "Save As" a 256-color file or a 24-bit file.

Shanghai: Second Dynasty uses a specific 256-color palette for the custom tile sets. If your tile set uses a 256-color palette different from the specific custom tile set palette, or if your tile set uses a 24-bit palette, the game will automatically convert your file's colors to the nearest colors in the Custom Tileset palette. This conversion is a straight color conversion, without any dithering. This may result in blotches of flat color where you had seen smooth gradations of color in your original picture. There is a way around this, but it requires a more advanced set of tools, and requires you to work a little harder.

Advanced Palette Tricks

If the game's palette converter has made blotchy colors on your image, you can try some advanced palette tricks, if you have tools (programs) that allow you to customize or edit your palette, or to import palettes. The best thing to do in this case is to create your tile set in 24-bit mode. Then Load or "stash" or "import" the 256-color palette from one of the custom tile sets from the CD. Then repalettize your image, using the "dither" option for the best possible result. Dithering causes little pixels of different colors to be displayed -- the eye sees the different colored pixels and blends them together into a mixed color. We apologize that we are unable to explain this process in greater detail -- hopefully your custom tile set looks good enough after the game's palette converter has done its thing.

Under some circumstances, if you use the exact same palette as certain custom tile sets provided with the game, you may see transparency where you meant to see white, when playing your custom tile set in the game. There are two things you can try to fix this. You may need an advanced graphic utility (such as Paint Shop Pro [TM]) to do these.

a. Modify the palette. Change all your white to nearly-white, and make any other change (a color swap, for instance) to the palette. Then the automatic palette converter in the game should fix the problem.

b. If you use the exact 256-color palette of some of our custom tile sets (thus bypassing the automatic palette converter), you must not use the first ten colors or the last ten colors in the palette. Repalettize your tile set image, disallowing the use of any of those twenty colors, and your transparency problem should be fixed.

Check the manual or online help file of your graphics program if you need more information about palettes.

Sharing Your Custom Tile Sets With Others

After creating and enjoying your custom tile set, you can share it with others by Email or posting on the Internet. You are encouraged to create original tile sets using your fully-owned imagery and to share these sets freely with others. You should be aware of the Software License Agreement that governs the use of custom tile sets in Shanghai. It's in the back of this manual, or you can open the file "SLA.txt" on your CD. Look for the section entitled "CONSTRUCTION KIT."

BMP files are not compressed, so they can be very large. A 24-bit custom tile set BMP file can be very large, so you should not just E-mail or post the files just as they are. Consider:

1. A Large 24-bit tile set file is more than a megabyte -- much too large to send by E-mail!

2. A Small 24-bit tile set file is about half a megabyte large -- still too large to E-mail.

3. A Large 256-color tile set file is almost 400K -- still quite large.

4. A Small 256-color tile set file is over 150K -- still pretty large for E-mail.

So, before you send a custom tile set file to a friend, it needs to be compressed. The most popular compression format is "Zip" format. There are a variety of compression programs available for downloading on the Internet, if you do not already have a program that can compress files for you. There are even programs for the Macintosh that support the "Zip" format.

Here's a little about compressed files.

.ZIP -- The most common compression format. Many programs available for download, for both Windows and Mac.

.SIT -- The most common format for Macintosh users. Look for "Stuffit." Windows users will have difficulty finding tools to decompress SIT files (there may not be any, or they may be difficult to find).

.ARC -- A less common compression format, but Windows users should be able to find a program that can handle it.

.LZH -- This format is mostly used in Japan, but you should be able to find a program that can handle LZH files.

The need to compress your files doesn't apply only to E-mail. It also applies to posting your files for others to download (either at a website or a bulletin board or a newsgroup). It would be best to ZIP the file before posting. If you want to post your files at a newsgroup, make sure you are sure that the newsgroup is one that allows the posting of "binaries." It would not be a good idea to post anything other than text at a non-binaries newsgroup. If you want to know more about restrictions on what can be posted at newsgroups, read the announcements at news:news.announce.newusers.

Enlarging or Reducing Sets to Share With Others

This section is about Large tiles vs. Small tiles, not file size. It may be that you use only the Small tiles, so you would probably make your custom set in Small size only. If you want to share your original tile set with others, you ought to consider that those others might want to play with your tile graphics in Large size. So it's best if you make not only Small, but also Large versions of your custom sets. You can either construct a Large set the same way you constructed your Small set (starting from scratch), or you can use your graphic utility's Resize function (if it has such a function, it may exist under a different name).

To enlarge Small tiles

A custom tile set designed to work with the "low resolution" game (set during the installation process) needs to be enlarged in order to work properly with the "high resolution" game.

Enlarge the Small tiles 150%, or enlarge the picture to 720x525 pixels. Then save with a name beginning with "L-". The game requires the Small tiles file to be 720x525 pixels exactly.

To reduce Large tiles

A custom tile set designed to work with the "high resolution" game (set during the installation process) needs to be reduced in order to work properly with the "low resolution" game.

Reduce Large tiles 66.6%, or reduce the picture to 480x350 pixels. Then save with a name beginning with "S-". The game requires the Small tiles file to be 480x350 pixels exactly.

Special Tips for owners of SHANGHAI: DYNASTY!

Importing Tile Sets from the Original Shanghai: Dynasty

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NOTE: This method is not supported by Activision Customer Support.
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It is possible to import the tile sets (both normal and custom) from the original Shanghai: Dynasty into Shanghai: Second Dynasty, but this requires some tweaking with a paint program. The following steps assume that you are using Windows. If you are a Macintosh user, the following steps should tell you generally what to do.

If you installed the original Shanghai Dynasty to the default directory, you can find the normal tilesets in C:\Program Files\Activision\Shanghai Dynasty\BMP. They are also on the CD (see earlier in this chapter for where to find the BMP folder on the CD).

For Low Resolution (when your monitor is set to 640x480 pixels or 800x600 pixels):
You just have to crop the BMP file to 480x350 pixels.
- Load the desired tile set BMP file in MSPaint.
- Go to the Image menu and select Attributes.
- In Width, type 480. In Height, type 350.
- Click OK. This should crop out all the white space at the right and bottom.
- Save the file with a new filename.
- Put the cropped file in the Custom Tilesets folder in the Shanghai Second Dynasty folder.

For High Resolution (when your monitor is set to 1024x768 pixels or higher):
You have to enlarge the cropped file to 720x525 pixels.
- Load the desired tile set BMP file in MSPaint.
- Go to the Image menu and select Attributes.
- In Width, type 720. In Height, type 525.
- Click OK. This should add a lot of white space at the right and bottom.
- Use the selection tool to make a tight box around the tileset image.
- Drag the lower-right edge of the selection and stretch the image so that it just takes up the entire picture. Make sure not to leave any white space at the edges.
- Save the file with a new filename.
- Put the cropped file in the Custom Tilesets folder in the Shanghai Second Dynasty folder.

Making Shanghai: Second Dynasty or Shanghai: Mah-Jongg Essentials tile sets work in Shanghai: Dynasty
You have to change the tile set BMP picture's dimensions to 640x480 pixels (just adding white space around the tiles is fine). And you have to alter the picture's palette. The custom tilesets that came with Shanghai: Dynasty all use the same "custom tileset palette." See the sections "About Palettes" and "Advanced Palette Tricks" for more about this somewhat technical procedure.

Filetyping (Macintosh only)

Macintosh users: This updated version of Shanghai will not refuse to open a custom card, tile set, or layout if the filetyping information ("Creator" and "File Type" attributes) is not "just so." But the original Macintosh version of Shanghai: Second Dynasty and Shanghai: Mah-Jongg Essentials will refuse to open custom cards, tile sets, or layouts if the filetyping information ("Creator" and "File Type" attributes) is not "just so."

So if you are sending a custom card, tile set, or layout to a user of the original (v1.0) Macintosh version of Shanghai: Second Dynasty or Shanghai: Mah-Jongg Essentials, it would be "user-friendly" if you would alter the Creator and File Type attributes before compressing and sending the file. (You are not obligated to do so, but it is probably not wrong to assume that someone who creates a custom card, tile set, or layout is more "computer literate" than someone who does not.)

There are several filetyping programs which can be obtained via the Internet:

* A Better Finder Creators & Types -- http://www.publicspace.net/ABetterFinderCreatorsAndTypes/
* FileBuddy -- http://www.skytag.com/FileBuddy.stuff/fb_download.html
* Change Type and Creator (CTC) -- http://www.eureka.ca/rmf/Docs/CMM.html#CTC

These are the Creator and File Types for Shanghai files which can be customized:

- Creator: ShD2 (Shanghai: Second Dynasty files)
- Creator: SMMj (Shanghai: Mah-Jongg Essentials files)
- File Type: card (custom American mah-jongg card files)
- File Type: patt (custom layout files)
- File Type: BMPf (custom tile set files)


The Team Tile Set!

In the Custom Tilesets folder is a special tile set containing faces of many of the folks who contributed to this game. If you are in low-res mode, look for "S-TEAM.BMP" -- if you're in high-res mode, look for "L-TEAM.BMP."

Here are the names to go with the faces:


1. Alexander Mialo (Creat)
2. Andrey Kaliukin (Creat)
3. Anton Lomakin (Creat)
4. Avenir Sniatkov (Creat)
5. Dmitry Kholodov (Creat)
6. Fidail Guilmoutdinov(Creat)
7. Natasha Kholiavko (Creat)
8. Vladimir Tchernych (Creat)
9. Chris Thacker (Presage)
10. Garrick Damir (Presage)
11. Kenny Harris (Presage)
12. Mike Terpstra (Presage)
13. Nina Gentile (Presage)
14. Paul Gorman (Presage)
15. Steve Snyder (Presage)
16. Bill Fisher (Quicksilver) -- 2 images (green border)
17. Otmar Schlunk (Quicksilver) -- 2 images (white border)
18. Michael "mig" Gerard (Quicksilver)
19. Dan "babyboy" Clarke (Quicksilver)
20. Gary Graeper (Quicksilver)
21. Redmond Urbino (Quicksilver) -- 2 images (red border)
22. Tim Hume (Quicksilver)
23. Brian MacDonald (Quicksilver) -- 2 images
24. Sarah McKinley Oakes (Quicksilver) -- 2 images (purple border)
25. Steve Roney (Quicksilver)
26. Eveline Cureteu (Activision) -- 2 images (orange border)
27. Heather Maxwell (Activision)
28. Oussama Akiki (Activision)
29. Chris Owens (Activision)
30. Bill Black (Big Fat Kitty)
31. Ed Clune (Activision)
32. Jeff Spierer (Activision)
33. Jeremy Gage (Activision)
34. Marietta Pashayan (Activision)
35. Tom Sloper (Activision) -- 4 images (yellow border)
36. Scott Lahman (Activision) -- 4 images (light blue border)
Back: The Activision "V"
Joker: Bob Sloper (Tom's cat)

We all sincerely hope you enjoy playing the game we worked so hard to create!


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